Strategic Facility Planning

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Long term planning is a vital part of improving the physical environment of the Academic Health Center. The strategic facility planning process aims to identify areas in need of improvement, align these needs with academic and strategic priorities of the AHC and then envision what these changes will achieve.

Not only does the AHC Office of Facilities and Capital Planning create plans for the Academic Health Center, it also aids the development of plans for specific schools and entire campuses within the U of M system.

AHC facility strategic plans

2015 AHC Strategic Facilities Plan Phase One Report

2015 AHC Strategic Facilities Plan Phase One Report

Download the 2015 AHC Strategic Facilities Plan Phase One Report

Download the 2015 AHC Strategic Facilities Plan Phase One Appendix

Summary: 

This Phase One report is part of an ongoing effort in 2015 to provide strategic planning to define the space & facility program that will support the future success of the AHC through engagement with appropriate stakeholders, analysis of existing conditions & relevant trends & identification of needs based on this analysis.

2006 Precinct Plan Task Force Report

2006 Precinct Plan Task Force Report

Download the 2006 Precinct Plan Task Force Report

Summary:

The 2006 Precinct Plan Task Force Report was both an update of the 1998 and 2000 plans and a specific charge of the University’s strategic positioning and planning efforts. The plan updated the inventory of space, including all of the investments made since 2000, and analyzed this data in reference to strategic positioning. The plan offered analysis and guidelines for development in the areas of patient care, research and education. 

2005 Clinical Sciences Campus Plan

2005 Clinical Sciences Campus Plan

Download the Clinical Sciences Campus Plan

Summary: 

In 2005 the Clinical Sciences Campus Plan vision was developed. It articulated planning principles and specific development opportunities for the clinical partnership of the Academic Health Center, the University of Minnesota Physicians and Fairview Health Services. Its goal was to create a campus environment and associated health sciences facilities necessary to attain the partnership’s vision of local, regional and international renown in patient care, research and health professional education. Several important master planning principles were articulated in this vision.

Principles of the Clinical Sciences Campus Plan:

  • Be guided by a long range vision of being a top tier patient care, education, and research institution; and shaped by the core programmatic priorities of the partners.
  • Support integrated inpatient and outpatient care delivery, including the move to a “single site” for the University of Minnesota Medical Center, Fairview.
  • Emphasize responsible use of resources – both capital and operations.  Duplication is to be tenaciously avoided; facility adjacencies supporting capital and operating efficiency will be pursued.
  • Be driven by an external customer focus.  The Clinical Campus will create a welcoming identity for visitors, patients, family, students, faculty, and staff.  For clinical facilities, patient and family access and service will be the primary priority.
  • Have mission focal points – for education, research, and patient care – which will deliberately link to each other.  Zoning of the Academic Health Center will reflect these missions.
  • Take advantage of the character of a large, urban, University while creating “community space” for interaction and reflection.  Site efficiency will be maximized.
  • Be an asset to investment in recruitment and retention of students, faculty, and staff.  Quality of facilities will be a key component of competitive positioning.
  • Support continued involvement of community-based physicians in patient care programs.  Ease of access and operational orientation will increase attractiveness to the private practice community.
  • Be driven by life cycle facility planning.  Sequencing of individual facility decisions based upon responsible continued use of facilities with outstanding debt and operational effectiveness will be emphasized by both Fairview and the University.
  • Both reflect and impact University-wide planning for transportation, parking, student housing, stadiums, energy, and other initiatives.  The Clinical Campus planning process should link closely with University-wide planning.
  • Be respectful of the University and the Fairview – University campus as part of a larger urban community.  The plan will engender the support of key external stakeholders.
  • The major deliverables in the completion of a Clinical Sciences Campus Plan for the University of Minnesota was not only the formulation of these planning principles but also the siting of a new 400,000 square foot clinic facility and a 360,000 square foot children’s hospital facility that will consolidate and enhance existing children’s services.

2000 Academic Health Center District Plan

2000 Academic Health Center District Plan

Download the 2000 Academic Health Center District Plan

Summary:

An outgrowth of the 1998 Strategic Facility Plan, the 2000 District Plan focused on a small, four square block area and sought to maximize the built environment opportunities of this area. Although it is limited to the Minneapolis campus of the and excludes clinical facilities, it, nonetheless provides a solid base for current planning on the east bank campus of the Academic Health Center.

Objectives of the 2000 District plan included:

  • Improve the visibility and ease of access to the AHC.
  • Transform its built environment into an attractive, intellectually energizing place.
  • Shorten links between collaborative programs and clarify circulation.
  • Replace obsolete facilities with ones that accommodate new educational, research and clinical technology and practice and that can easily be adapted to serve changing programs and interdisciplinary efforts.
  • Provide sufficient space with the district to support the future needs of a competitive AHC.

To accomplish these objectives:

  • The plan assumes the eventual replacement of obsolete and inefficient structures and maximizes the available real estate.
  • The plan creates a landscaped central square with a variety of functional areas for use by students, staff and patients.
  • The plan organizes internal and external circulation networks around the new central square for efficient way finding. It also differentiates and extends pedestrian, vehicular and service circulation systems throughout the complex and into adjoining districts. A structure of spaces, landmarks and unifying architectural elements reinforces the new circulation concepts.
  • The plan provides a framework, schedule, and locations for identified upcoming projects over the next 15-20 years. It replaces approximately 1 million square feet of obsolete and inefficient structures with 1.3 million square feet of new construction.

1998 AHC Strategic Facility Planning

1998 AHC Strategic Facility Planning

Download the 1998 AHC Strategic Facility Plan

Summary:

The 1998 AHC Strategic Facility Planning began to address the dissatisfaction, challenges and opportunities of planning and managing AHC facilities. These opportunities and challenges were that:

  • Academic priorities needed to guide space assignment and use of facilities.
  • A rational, understandable process for developing and prioritizing projects was needed.
  • Interscholastic cooperation was required to solve a number of major  facilities challenges

Numerous guiding principles were developed during this planning effort which have been carried forward into subsequent planning activities:

  • The AHC cares about its people.
  • Facilities should aesthetically foster learning, collegiality and discovery. All facilities need to be aesthetic, clean and work properly
  • The AHC’s students, staff, faculty and visitors need gathering spaces to create a sense of community.
  • The AHC needs research spaces that can respond flexibly to program and grant requests.
  • The AHC should have a sense of “here” provided by a common theme, circulation spaces, or identifiers. Wayfinding needs to be simplified.
  • Curriculum needs should drive the design of new and renovated educational spaces.
  • Creating common areas for students near faculty office would make these offices more accessible to students.
  • “Short streets” should link the AHC’s education, research, and clinical operations to enhance collaboration, synergy and faculty productivity.

1968 Health Sciences Planning Report

1968 Health Sciences Planning Report

Download the 1968 Health Sciences Planning Report

Summary:

This 1968 report provides architectural definition of a University of Minnesota long-term development program for the Health Sciences, a planning process that began with a study of “health manpower needs in the Upper Midwest,” and led to a $54 million Regents’ proposal for a physical facilities development program for the College of Medical Sciences and the School of Dentistry that would make possible increases in enrollment and introduction of new programs while maintaining the quality of existing programs, and resulted in the prominent concrete buildings of the AHC Core. Have you ever heard someone refer to Unit J or the KE dock? This report reveals why.

Campus master plans

The Office of Facilities and Capital Planning also plays a role in contributing to campus master plans. The University of Minnesota Master Plan was last updated in 2009. Changes to the original 1996 document have ensured that the AHC's strategic planning goals are part of the future of the University. The update of the University of Minnesota Master Plan calls upon planning resources from across the University community.